Chiyonosono

Known as the Junmai expert, Chiyonosono was the first brewery to stop adding distilled alcohol to its sake after the rice shortages of World War II, paving the way for the popular Junmai category. Originally a rice wholesaler, Chiyonosono specializes in rice cultivation. Chiyonosono has access to heirloom strains and brews sake with distinctive rice textures and aromas. The brewery is located on the southernmost island of Kyushu—the gateway into Japan—known for Asian and European cuisine, historic architecture, and distinct regional culture. The future 5th generation president and daughter of current the current brewery president, Yuri Honda, is already making a name for herself as an innovator in the sake community and is primed to continue pushing the brewery toward forward-thinking yet approachable sake.

Sakes

Sacred Power

Made with the heirloom rice Kumamoto Shinriki which was revitalized after being out of use for 50-100 years. Chiyonosono is among the very few breweries who have revived rice strains after being out of use. Shinriki literally means “Sacred Power” in Japanese and represents the bold, briny ocean flavors present in the sake.

Shared Promise

A commitment from the brewery to make premium sake despite agricultural hardships like those of WWII. Until this sake came along in the 1960’s, all sake had distilled alcohol added to it due to rice shortages and war rationing. After the war, Chiyonosono crafted the first junmai sake (brewed without distilled alcohol nor additives of any kind) and celebrated by sharing it from a large, red lacquered sake cup called a Shuhai.

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Trade Materials

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